The new fishing bins are designed to help protect wildlife.
The new fishing bins are designed to help protect wildlife. Contributed

Bins a reel help for wildlife

The council is reducing the risk of death and injury to Coast wildlife by installing 36 fishing-line recovery bins at popular fishing spots between Bell's Creek and the Maroochy River catchment.

Environment portfolio holder councillor Keryn Jones said the installation of the specially-designed bins was funded by a federal government Caring for our Country grant and was part of the council's ongoing turtle conservation project. “This initiative aims to save wildlife from death or injury from carelessly discarded fishing line and reduce the volume of litter entering our waterways,” Ms Jones said.

“Recreational fishing is a very popular activity and, inevitably, some fishing line and tackle must be disposed of.

“Unfortunately, unless that's done properly, birds, fish, turtles and other wildlife may become entangled in it or ingest it.

It can also spoil the enjoyment of other fishers, is a potential hazard to other water users and it pollutes our environment.

“It's a problem that council hopes to address through the installation of 36 specially-designed bins at key recreational fishing locations across the region.”

The new bins follow a successful trial in the Noosa area several years ago and, once the current installations are done, the bins will be in use across the region.


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