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It’s true: clouds have silver lining

Sherida Holford, front, with her daughter, Safron, 3, and fellow Coolum Coast Care members, from left, Wendy Gordon, Trich Firth and Warwick and Robyn Peters. Photo: Brett Wortman/178127d
Sherida Holford, front, with her daughter, Safron, 3, and fellow Coolum Coast Care members, from left, Wendy Gordon, Trich Firth and Warwick and Robyn Peters. Photo: Brett Wortman/178127d

When a major corporation offered Coolum Coast Care the services of 220 of its best people to plant and weed between Stumers Creek and the Maroochy River for three hours, the community group thought it was raining manpower.

But it turned out it was just raining.

The Boston Consultancy Group, which held a conference at the Coolum Hyatt last week, had offered to help plant 2700 native trees as part of a team-building exercise for its employees.

But on Thursday, unseasonal torrential rain washed out the well-planned operation.

Coast Care president Leigh Warneminde said a lot of work had gone into organising the event and it was very disappointing it had to be cancelled.

“We don’t get 220 people helping us every day,” she said.

“And we could have got a lot done.

“You can imagine how many weeds we could have got out – and 2700 plants – in the three hours.

“It will take us much longer to do it on our own.”

But as the old saying goes, every cloud has a silver lining: the silver in this case was $10,000 worth of equipment and plants.

Because Coast Care did not have enough trowels and gloves to cater for more than 200 volunteers, the Boston group simply paid for Coast Care to go out and buy them.

“They gave us $10,000,” Ms Warneminde said.

“I’ve been out shopping for tools for weeks and weeks.

“So we now have about 220 pairs of gloves and about a hundred hand trowels.

“It’s a big win for us.”

Ms Warneminde said Coast Care was very grateful for the Boston Consultancy Group’s generosity.

“They just rang and said that they were coming up here on a conference and they were interested in doing something to help us while they were here,” she said.

“Their willingness to put back into the community while they’re here on a conference is a really positive thing. The community stood to gain heaps.”

Coast Care is appealing for other corporate groups or schools to help out with planting and weeding.

“If there are bigger groups of people that want to do things with us in the environment we now have the capacity – we’ve got the tools,” Ms Warneminde said.

Last week was also Weedbusters Week, and Coast Care and other volunteers were on hand at Coolum Community Native Nursery where residents could swap a bag of weeds for a native tree and a copy of the Sunshine Coast council’s gardening booklet, Our Locals are Beauties.


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