Lifestyle

New cafe is a labour of love

SERVICE: Lucas van Boven and Jane Seidl at Waiting For Huey at Town of Seaside, Marcoola.
SERVICE: Lucas van Boven and Jane Seidl at Waiting For Huey at Town of Seaside, Marcoola. Erle Levey

FROM firing missiles in the army to making pastries and coffee at Marcoola, it's been an interesting journey for Lucas van Boven.

Yet with his wife Jane Seidl and young family he wouldn't want to be anywhere else.

Lucas and Jane opened Waiting for Huey Espresso Bar at the Town of Seaside in May, based on personal blend coffee and hand-made pastries.

Having started baking at the age of 14, Lucas took up an apprenticeship in Quilpie, far south-west Queensland.

After baking for 11 years he turned to a life-long dream and joined the army entering into the artillery corp. After three and a half years based at 16th air defence regiment in South Australia he transferred to become an avionic technician on Blackhawks and was eventually posted to Townsville.

Wanting to get back to the Sunshine Coast, Lucas took on a casual baking job in Noosa, where Jane had settled into her job at Halse Lodge, and their son Jax started Prep at Yandina State School, the same school that Jane went to as a child.

"We explored many options to start up a business on the coast and fate led us to the Town of Seaside," Lucas said.

"The name Waiting for Huey is a play on words.

"The saying 'send it down Huey' was used by farmers during times of drought and can be traced back to the '40s.

"Australian surfers adopted Huey as our own surf god who we pray to for waves in times of no or little swell, or even if you've just been sitting out on your board for a while with no waves coming your way.

"So Waiting for Huey is my way of saying, come in and have a cuppa and relax with friends while you're waiting for the surf to pick up."

On the menu you can find a range of quality hand- made pastries comparable and reminiscent of those in a good European bakery, as well as a small selection of cakes, fresh fruit salad and other snacks.

Down to the important things though: coffee.

Lucas and Jane have their own blend, which was developed with the master roaster at the Coffee Place, Kunda Park.

So not only is their coffee locally roasted on the Sunshine Coast, it is also made using 90% Australian-grown beans.

Using local and free range produce is also important.

"We buy our fruit and vegies from Matts Farm Fresh in Coolum, which supports local growers," Lucas said.

"Our small goods are supplied by the Yandina Butchery, which specialises in free range produce.

"And I personally pick up our free range eggs from McDougall's egg farm at Woombye.

"Overall we aim to deliver a quality, enjoyable product, in a relaxed and friendly atmosphere and still at a reasonable price.

"Because at the end of the day, the word is hospitality," Lucas said.

"We are so blessed to have found such a wonderful community in which to begin our new life."


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