Woman raped by Brock Turner identified

 

THE sexual assault victim of American college student Brock Turner has revealed her identity ahead of releasing a book about the harrowing attack.

Chanel Miller, 27, from San Francisco, will speak out publicly for the first time this weekend about an incident in which she was targeted by Turner while unconscious at a frat party in January 2015.

The sexual assault victim of American college student Brock Turner has revealed her identity ahead of releasing a book about the harrowing attack.
The sexual assault victim of American college student Brock Turner has revealed her identity ahead of releasing a book about the harrowing attack.

In 2016, Turner was convicted of three felony sexual assault charges, for which the maximum sentence was 14 years.

But at the time, the victim was known only as "Emily Doe" - as an "unconscious, intoxicated woman" and the "victim of Stanford University swimmer Brock Turner".

The case made global headlines and sparked outrage after the judge, Aaron Persky, hit the 20-year-old with a sentence of six months - of which Turner only served three.

"The punishment does not fit the crime," said Local District Attorney Jeff Rosen after the sentence was announced.

"The sentence does not factor in the true seriousness of this sexual assault, or the victim's ongoing trauma. Campus rape is no different than off-campus rape. Rape is rape."

In an editorial, local newspaper the San Jose Mercury News called the six-month county jail sentence "a slap on the wrist".

"Brock Turner's six-month jail term for sexual assault of an intoxicated, unconscious woman on the Stanford campus last year is a setback for the movement to take campus rape seriously," the newspaper said.

"If Turner's slap on the wrist sentence is a setback, activists can take some comfort that the jurors at the trial in March saw what happened as a very serious crime."

Miller, a writer and an artist who now has a bachelor's degree in literature from the College of Creative Studies at UCSB, gave a powerful statement against her rapist that also made world headlines.

"You don't know me, but you've been inside me," she said in 2016. "You are the cause, I am the effect. You have dragged me through this hell with you, dipped me back into that night again and again. You knocked down both our towers, I collapsed at the same time you did. If you think I was spared, came out unscathed, that today I ride off into sunset, while you suffer the greatest blow, you are mistaken. Nobody wins. We have all been devastated, we have all been trying to find some meaning in all of this suffering."

 

The 7000-word statement was published in full by news outlets around the world, including news.com.au, and was read aloud on CNN and by members of Congress on the House Floor to enter it into the national record.

Miller's book, Know My Name, will hit the shelves on September 24.

"Emily Doe's experience illuminates a culture built to protect perpetrators and a criminal justice system designed to fail the most vulnerable," Andrea Schulz, editor in chief of Viking publishing, wrote in a statement.

"The book will introduce readers to the writer whose words have already changed their world and move them with its accounting of her courage and resilience."

Schulz told The New York Times it is "one of the most important books I've ever published", adding: "It could change the culture that we live in and the assumptions we make about what survivors should be expected to go through to get justice."

The book's publisher, Penguin Random House, said Miller is reclaiming her identity with its release.

"Her story illuminates a culture biased to protect perpetrators, indicts a criminal justice system designed to fail the most vulnerable, and, ultimately, shines with the courage required to move through suffering and live a full and beautiful life," the publisher's summary says.


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